Michael Oliver, 26, poses for a photo in his neighborhood in Detroit on July 8, 2020. Last year, he was accused of reaching into a vehicle, grabbing a cell phone from a man then damaging it. Officials concluded Oliver had been misidentified as the perpetrator and dismissed the case. Detroit police used facial recognition technology in the investigation.
Michael Oliver, 26, poses for a photo in his neighborhood in Detroit on July 8, 2020. Last year, he was accused of reaching into a vehicle, grabbing a cell phone from a man then damaging it. Officials concluded Oliver had been misidentified as the perpetrator and dismissed the case. Detroit police used facial recognition technology in the investigation.

The high-profile case of a Black man wrongly arrested earlier this Criminal Defense Lawyer in Chicago year wasn’t the first misidentification linked to controversial facial recognition technology used by Detroit police, the Free Press has learned.

Last year, a 25-year-old Detroit man was wrongly accused of a felony for supposedly reaching into a teacher’s vehicle, grabbing a cell phone and throwing it, cracking the screen and breaking the case.

Detroit police used facial recognition technology in that investigation, too.

It identified Michael Oliver as an investigative lead. After that hit, the teacher 

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